Colorism, Slave Mentality, & Profanity; 2015 Rap Culture

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Older generations often scoff at the rap genre for its audacious lyrics, gaudy music videos, and affinity for exploiting and degrading women. For years, money, women, and material things have bombarded the radio waves connecting both minorities and Whites to the struggles of inner city artists. These artists put pen to pad and boast in the booths about their trials, tribulations, and uprisings to fame (often flaunting record label money that doesn’t really belong to them). But within the flashy pool of Soulja Boys and Waka Flockas swim a few true lyricists who make a conscious decision to stand for something. These rappers step out of the box, offering the occasional introspective, culturally sensitive and socially conscious verse to wake us up and bring us back to the here and now.

So what about the here and now? Monday J. Cole released the music video to G.O.M.D., a popular track from his most recent release, 2015 Forest Hills Drive. Lyrically, the song flaunts a pretty typical rap song skeleton. But between the crude language Cole pokes fun at the Lil Jon throwback Get Low and addresses the lack of substance within the most popular lyrics these days.

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